Monday, April 6, 2009

College of Saint Elizabeth Professor Rewarded for Excellence in Holocaustolatry

Executive Director of NJ Commission on Holocaust Education to Bestow Honorary Award to CSE Professor, April 19

Courtney Smolen/College of Saint Elizabeth

April 06, 2009

On Sunday, April 19, the New Jersey Commission on Holocaust Education will bestow its Sister Rose Thering Award on Dr. Harriet Lipman Sepinwall, professor of Education and co-director of the Holocaust Education Resource Center at the College of Saint Elizabeth during the Sister Rose Thering Endowment's Evening of Roses Program, at Seton Hall University's Jubilee Hall.

The Sister Rose Thering Award was established by the Commission to honor the life work of Sister Rose in the area of education, specifically relates to anti-Semitism, the Holocaust/genocide and prejudice reduction, and in developing relationships between the Jewish and non-Jewish communities to better enhance and strengthen relationships with each other and Israel.

Commission Executive Director Dr. Paul B. Winkler notes that Dr. Sepinwall's efforts and personal humanity make her an outstanding recipient of this award.

"With the establishing of the College of Saint Elizabeth's Holocaust Education Resource Center, Harriet has led the charge in implementing the mandate to provide Holocaust and genocide education to all children," says Dr. Winkler. "Through her efforts, Harriet has brought together many ecumenical groups in working toward a common goal toward prejudice awareness and reduction. She has carried out this belief of the importance of Israel and the importance of all people caring about one other, and for that we honor her."

A native of New York, residing in Pine Brook, N.J., Dr. Sepinwall earned her baccalaureate and master degrees from The City College of New York and her Ed.D. in Educational Foundations from Rutgers University.

Dr. Sepinwall was founder and co-chair of the New Jersey Studies Academic Alliance, a coalition of teachers, librarians and museum and historic site professionals and archivists. She is a member of the NJ-Israel Commission, through which she developed a summer institute for teachers on terrorism and democracy. With Sister Kathleen Flanagan, she co-founded and is co-director of the College of Saint Elizabeth Holocaust Education Resource Center established in 1994. She presents annual workshops on Holocaust education at the National Catholic Educational Association (NCEA) Convention. This year, one of the workshops will highlight the first Holocaust survivor testimony to be given at the NCEA.

Dr. Sepinwall's initiatives on behalf of the College have enabled CSE undergraduates to travel to Poland to participate on the international March of Remembrance and Hope, visiting sites of the Holocaust and working to develop ways to end intolerance. She was a leader in the planning for the 2005 March of the Living organization's national Catholic Educators' Mission to Poland, a project co-sponsored by the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, the National Catholic Educational Association, the AntiDefamation League, and the College of Saint Elizabeth, and also served as the Mission's scholar for the Catholic school teachers. This historic mission, which included CSE faculty, commemorated the 60th anniversary of the Holocaust and the 40th anniversary of the Vatican II document Nostra Aetate, on Catholic teaching about Jews and Judaism.

Dr. Sepinwall has worked with the Paterson Diocesan Schools, the Newark Archdiocesan Schools, and with the United Jewish Communities of MetroWest New Jersey to provide a variety of programs for middle and high school students, for teacher training, and for the community.

A member of congregation Agudath Israel of West Essex in Caldwell, N.J., she is the mother of Stacy, Alyssa, and Alan, and grandmother of Julia Sepinwall and Jacob Goldstein. Her husband, Dr. Jerry Sepinwall, died in 1998.

In addition, the Evening of Roses will bestow its 2009 Humanitarian of the Year Awards upon Maud Dahme, a hidden child of the Holocaust, and posthumously to Irena Sendler, who as a young Polish social worker saved more than 2,500 Jewish children from death at the hands of the Nazis. New Jersey Senate President former Governor Richard Codey will be the afternoon's featured speaker.

http://www.nj.com/morristown/cse/index.ssf/2009/04/executive_director_of_nj_commi.html

9 comments:

Prodinoscopus said...

That's nice. Meanwhile, underground historians who dare to question the official account of the Holocaust are thrown into German dungeons.

There's tolerance for you. It warms the heart, doesn't it.

Anonymous said...

Maybe the Germans know something you're too blind to see...

Maurice Pinay said...

Maybe the Germans know something you're too blind to see...

***

It takes a strange kind of sight to "see" that it's tolerant to imprison non-believers.

Prodinoscopus said...

Obviously Anon 4:16 thinks that "religious liberty" applies to everyone except those who deny the Shoah super-dogma. Eh, Anon?

Anonymous said...

Anon: What are you doing here?

Anonymous said...

For anyone who would like to evangelize the Faith:
hsepinwall@cse.edu, kflanagan@cse.edu, nanderson@cse.edu, gsirgiovanni@cse.edu, dcollesano@cse.edu, cgrigo@cse.edu, plachance@cse.edu, cmartin@cse.edu, asantamaria@cse.edu, ssimonaitis@cse.edu, so-inst@tulane.edu, probins@tulane.edu, lhill@tulane.edu, holocaus@doe.state.nj.us, jdougher@doe.state.nj.us, rabbi@agudath.org, info@agudath.org, exdir@agudath.org, president@agudath.org, cantor@agudath.org, progdir@agudath.org, szofi@agudath.org, nursery@agudath.org, bocaberger@comcast.net, jewishst@tulane.edu, saftanola@aol.com, vandebilthi@htdiocese.org, sschexnayder@htdiocese.org, rchauvin@htdiocese.org, dhamilton@htdiocese.org, harceneaux@htdiocese.org, dkeife@htdiocese.org, jreiss@htdiocese.org, qmoreaux@htdiocese.org, bcadams@htdiocese.org, wdupre@htdiocese.org

Anonymous said...

Maybe the Germans know something you're too blind to see...

***

It takes a strange kind of sight to "see" that it's tolerant to imprison non-believers.
-----------------------
Just to clarify...I know this is complicated, so I'll go slowly...

What the Germans know very well is that the Holocaust happened.

Maurice Pinay said...

Just to clarify...I know this is complicated, so I'll go slowly...

What the Germans know very well is that the Holocaust happened.


***

Do you think so?

I wonder if all Germans know, or believe that the Supreme Holocaust, the crucifixion of God incarnate at Calvary, is commemorated today (Good Friday). I believe many of them don't know and that many others deny it. The deniers of the Supreme Holocaust of Jesus Christ are not imprisoned in Germany as the deniers of alleged homicidal Nazi gas chambers are. So "tolerance" in Germany today is a patent fraud.

There are other holocausts than the Supreme Holocaust of Calvary that many Germans are unaware of or deny today. The 1911 Catholic Encyclopedia mentions one of them:

---
The holocaust of 1847 threw thousands of Irish children on the charity of the public ... The survivors of the famine years — the few who still survive — recall with tears the memory of those score witnessed in their early childhood; and yet what seemed an irreparable disaster only proved, as in so many other instances in the history of the Irish race, to be a triumph of their Faith, and history has not failed to record it. The Irish, in 1847, brought their traditions with them across the Atlantic, and in those moments of direst sorrow and misery it was their religion which buoyed them up. It will forever be to their glory that, far from yielding to despair at the sacrifices demanded, they accepted their sad fate with sublime resignation, and went to their death blessing the Hand that smote them.

http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/08132b.htm
---

I haven't heard of any German deniers of the mid 19th century holocaust of the Irish being thrown into prison, have you?

These so called "Jews" who screech their blood libels that the "goyim" must assent their will to received "Holocaust" lore so that they will never again attempt to exterminate "The Jewish People" could learn a lot from the Irish, among the most persecuted people in history, whose holocausts are largely unknown to the world and who have no mind to imprison deniers of them.

But I have great hope. The Supreme Holocaust of the redeemer Jesus Christ, which we commemorate today, liberates us from the "Holocaust" tyranny of the modern Pharisees. You too can be freed if you believe.

Prodinoscopus said...

It will forever be to their glory that, far from yielding to despair at the sacrifices demanded, they accepted their sad fate with sublime resignation, and went to their death blessing the Hand that smote them.

A most profound reminder of how the suffering Irish followed the example of Our Lord Jesus Christ. In view of this lesson, does it matter if 6 million or 600,000 Jews were murdered during WWII, and whether or not they were gassed? The question is how they have chosen to accept their sad fate. Have they blessed the Hand of the Lord that smote them (using either Nazi devils or Babylonian princes of old), or have they struck back with hatred and vengeance and lies?