Sunday, October 16, 2011

Benedict XVI to Further Alter 1962 Missal

From Chiesa:
"The activity of the Holy See" is a hefty volume that gives a year-by-year account of the actions of the pope and the Roman curia. It is an "unofficial publication," as specified on the frontispiece, but in spite of this it contains not a little information, sometimes rather unusual, that cannot be found in other Vatican sources.

To verify this it is enough to leaf through the latest edition, on the activities of 2010, which has just been printed by Libreria Editrice Vaticana (1343 pp., 80.00 euro).

In it we learn, for example:

... that a joint commission was set up, with experts of the commission "Ecclesia Dei" and of the congregation for divine worship, for the "updating" of the commemorations of the saints and the "possible insertion of new prefaces" into the preconciliar Roman missal of 1962, to which Benedict XVI gave full citizenship in 2007 ...

Full article:

http://chiesa.espresso.repubblica.it/articolo/1349490?eng=y
And some context from the pope's brother rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein:

"There still is resistance to the new teachings in some traditional Catholic circles, still much work to be done to erase old ideas." (Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein, "The Catholic Church and the Jews," Cross-Currents, July 3, 2009)


"The differences between accepted Church teaching and this group of Latin-speaking extremists are not subject to reconciliation.” (Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein, Wiesenthal Center, January 23, 2009)

Also see:

Rabbi Yitzchok Adlerstein on Traditional Catholicism

Cardinal Jean-Pierre Ricard of Ecclesia Dei Commission Studying Talmud at NY Yeshiva

Ecclesia Dei Cardinal Castrillon Hoyos Lauded Sheilding of Admitted Sex Predator from Justice


14 comments:

Anonymous said...

Utterly predictable.

The "Missal of 1962" became the "Missal of 2008" with the first set of Judaizing changes.

Why wouldn't the Novus Ordo neo-Pharisees subvert it again?

I can hardly wait for Michael Matt's forthcoming Remnant article, "Papal Masterstroke II."

Anonymous said...

No aspect of the liturgy of the Catholic Church is off-limits to the Roman Pontiff.

John XXIII inserted St. Joseph into the Canon of the Mass.

Now that Benedict has revived the Tridentine Mass he has every right to add prefaces or update the calendar. The Mass is not a fossil. Pope St. Pius V showed us that truth.

If you are a sedevacantist or a schismatic you don’t recognize the right of this Pontiff. If you are a Roman Catholic you do. The exercise of that right is not proof that the pope is what you call him, a rabbi.

Make your points without insults or extreme confidence in your own judgments.

Maurice Pinay said...

That John XXIII is the earliest example you can cite of a Pope altering the Canon speaks for itself. A refresher of the undiluted meaning of the term 'canon' may be in order.

Your reasoning is off track. No Pope has the right to be the instrument of the will of the Pharisees. And that is what is going on here.

Please read:

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2007/08/chief-rabbinate-of-israel.html

http://mauricepinay.blogspot.com/2008/06/vatican-answers-to-chief-rabbinate-of.html

Diego said...

@ Anonymous 9:31 AM

The Vatican Council infallibly defined some papal limits:

“For the Holy Spirit was promised to the successors of Peter not so that they might, by His revelation, make known some new doctrine, but that, by His assistance, they might religiously guard and faithfully expound the revelation or Deposit of Faith transmitted by the Apostles.” — Pastor Aeternus

Similarly Quo Primum from the infallible the Council of Trent prohibited tampering with the Mass.

Catholic dogma and liturgy are not play things for Pharisees or even for the men who "subsist in" the Chair of Peter—to borrow Ratzinger's own phrase.

Diego a.k.a. Anonymous 1:59 AM

Jack said...

\\John XXIII inserted St. Joseph into the Canon of the Mass.\\

The Ambrosian Rite uses what is basically the Roman Canon--with some textual variations, especially in the final Per ipsum.

But there are the names of local saints of Milan in various places in it. Did you know that?

And when old Celtic missals are examined, there are names of Old Testament righteous and other saints that are NOT in the Roman recension of the Canon.

Obviously, this text was NOT considered as immutable originally as people lately want to think.

**Similarly Quo Primum from the infallible the Council of Trent prohibited tampering with the Mass.**

Believe it or not, the Missale Romanum was tinkered with CONSTANTLY after the Council of Trent by various popes. 1962 was only the last in a long string of such tinkerings.

One such change that immediately comes to mind was the REMOVAL of prayers for the Emperor.

Most holy Theotokos, save us!

Anonymous said...

Jack the ignoramus writes:

"Believe it or not, the Missale Romanum was tinkered with CONSTANTLY after the Council of Trent by various popes. 1962 was only the last in a long string of such tinkerings.

One such change that immediately comes to mind was the REMOVAL of prayers for the Emperor."



The truth is the exact opposite of what Jack the Ignoramus writes. The removal of the prayers to the Emperor, made in 1884, is almost the ONLY change made to the Ordinary of the Mass from 1474 (not 1570) to 1962. The changes of 1607 and 1637, as for those of 1570, were only changes in orthography, punctuation and style. Then there was no new editio typica until 1884. The changes there were tiny, as were those of the 1920 typical edition.

The only period of substantial change from the sixth century to 1962 was that from 1100 to 1400, and most of the changes were additive; they were much more rarely deletions, re-orderings, or recastings. There were some rubrical changes and changes in musical settings. The sources for the editions were most ancient as well; hence the changes were truly 'organic'. For example, the Gloria was added in that period but had been used at papal Masses for centuries before then.

The Canon has remained unchanged from the sixth century to 1962 except for additions of Amens and some prayer endings. It was untouchable in the substance of the prayers. The available evidence also suggests that the prayers of the Canon were of very ancient origins and were only re-ordered and curtailed in the fourth through the sixth centuries. Read Fortescue’s book on the Mass. What Jack the fool here, what we get is someone whose information comes from Internet searches.

P.K.T.P.

Anonymous said...

"No Pope has the right to be the instrument of the will of the Pharisees."

Or Sorcerer's Apprentice.

Anonymous said...

Although Quo Primum was part of a Dogmatic Council, the parts of it that were not dogmatic are not unchangeable. Where the council refers to not changing the Mass it also says that people using a 200 + year old Missal may continue to use it, therefore the proclamation about the Mass must be a discipline as it is not a teaching for the whole universal church to follow.

Jack said...

PKTP: \\What Jack the fool here, what we get is someone whose information comes from Internet searches.\\

Jesus said: Matthew 5:22
But I say unto you, That whosoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the judgment: and whosoever shall say to his brother, Raca, shall be in danger of the council: but whosoever shall say, Thou fool, shall be in danger of hell fire.

BTW, PKTP, I got my information from dealing with scholarly books on the subject, including my translation of the Ordinary of the Ambrosian liturgy.

In the meantime, keep on blessing me. All you do is increase my heavenly treasure.

Most holy Theotokos, save us.

Anonymous said...

When people meant no tinkering, it is referred to the Ordinary of the Mass, NOT THE PROPERS!

Rubricarius said...

'The Canon has remained unchanged from the sixth century to 1962 except for additions of Amens and some prayer endings.'

But this statement is not historically correct. There were some minor changes between the typical editions of the Missal of 1570 and 1604.

Of course we can talk about extended periods of stability and then radical change in the twentieth century but does it help an argument to gloss over history?

Jack said...

\\therefore the proclamation about the Mass must be a discipline as it is not a teaching for the whole universal church to follow.\\

Quo primum was always limited to the Western Church, as it simply involved the imposition the imposition of the Roman Missal.

It never referred to the Eastern Churches at all.

cyrillist said...

Altering the 1962 Missal? Might as well. That Missal is hopelessly compromised as it stands, most notable by the 1955 Holy Week revisions. The 1920 Missal is the hill I'd prefer to die on.

Anonymous said...

I'm sure there are going to be changes to the "catholic" bible soon..