Sunday, May 27, 2012

Genocidal Judaism Let Off Again

“when we come upon a non-Jew who is not keeping the seven [Noahide] laws, and we kill him out of concern for the keeping of the seven laws, it is not prohibited.” 

Charges Unlikely for Advocates of Killings


May 25, 2012

[Israeli] Attorney General Yehuda Weinstein is tending toward not prosecuting the author or endorsers of the controversial book “Torat Hamelech,” Haaretz has learned.

The book, written in 2009 by Rabbi Yitzhak Shapira and Rabbi Yosef Elitzur, was endorsed by two other rabbis, Yitzhak Ginzburg and Dov Lior. The authors describe it as a discussion of Jewish law on the conditions under which it is permissible to kill a non-Jew in times of war and peace.

The book’s publication led to the launch of a criminal investigation against the four rabbis for incitement to racism and violence.

According to one [of many genocidal] statement[s] in the book, “when we come upon a non-Jew who is not keeping the seven [Noahide] laws, and we kill him out of concern for the keeping of the seven laws, it is not prohibited.”
Weinstein is expected to explain that he is basing his decision on limiting the use of criminal law as a tool to deal with offenses involving freedom of expression, particularly in light of the fact that the statements were made as part of a religious tract, as general statements, and the book mentions neither the word “Arab” nor the word “Palestinian.”

 Also see:

The REAL Hidden Dangers of the Rainbow

"Noahide" Thought for the Day

Kosher-Catholic Paulist Press Pushes "Noahide" Fraud 

1 comment:

Malleus Haereticorum said...

What a contrast with how the Jews treated Ariel Toaff, a professor at Bar-Ilan University in Israel and son of the former chief rabbi of Rome, upon the publication of "Bloody Passover: Jews of Europe and Ritual Homicide".

The thrust of the professor's book was that Ashkenazi Jews had indeed kidnapped and crucified Catholic children -- e.g., Saint Simon of Trent -- using their blood for religious rituals, particularly at Passover.

You needn't imagine the reaction, because here are just some of the details: Members of the Knesset demanded that Toaff be tried, and there were calls for civil suits because Toaff had damaged "historic truth and the reputation of the Jewish people." Also, Bar-Ilan University condemned their professor's "attempt to justify the awful blood libels against Jewish people." Toaff initially held firm, but quickly gave way to the pressure and threats (some of a physical nature). Within a week of publication, Toaff apologized, halted the book's distribution, and promised to donate all profits to the ADL.

As Catholic scholar Marian Horvat points out: "We are simply supposed to dismiss as anti-Semitic ranting any argumentation, even data presented by a serious Jewish scholar, which would uphold that the Catholics could have been justified in their claims that Jews in the Middle Ages practiced blood libel, Kabbalitic black magic, and child crucifixions." And why? Because of characteristically Jewish "reasoning", that's why. As Horvat observes: "If it is against the Jews, it is wrong, that's all there is to it."